Tag Archives: washington

The Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC

Though I’ve lived in Virginia for seven years and I love to photograph flowers, I had never been to Washington DC’s Cherry Blossom Festival. I fixed that on Sunday. Since then, I’ve been working to transfer, organize and edit my 860 photos. Then my primary computer crashed in a fiery blaze, and will require repairs. But I could pull off some of the work and my favorites are below. The tidal basin in DC is lined with 2000 cherry trees, and they were all at their absolute peak Sunday. It was one of the most beautiful days I’ve ever enjoyed. It was packed with people, which I usually hate but Sunday they didn’t matter.

Check out full size images as well as several enormous panoramas here.

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC. Taken on April 12, 2015.

Jefferson Memorial & Cherry Blossoms. Combination of two images with focus stacking.

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC. Taken on April 12, 2015.

The Washington Monument & Cherry Blossoms.

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC. Taken on April 12, 2015.

Jefferson Memorial & Cherry Blossoms

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC. Taken on April 12, 2015.

Flowers at the George Mason Memorial

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC. Taken on April 12, 2015.

The Washington Monument & Cherry Blossoms

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC. Taken on April 12, 2015.

Fun science: more crystals!

Months ago, I posted about the collection of crystals and minerals at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum. Well, I went again, this time armed with a nicer (and heavier!) camera, and below are a few of the finds.SONY DSC

Quartz: quartz is a very common type of type of mineral (the second most common after feldspar), made up of silicon and oxygen. This variation is called agate. I used to buy agate slices as a kid, but the Smithsonian’s are slightly fancier.

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Another example of quartz. This one arose in a piece of petrified wood. I like this one because it looks like a painting of a setting sun behind a row of pine trees–almost Japanese.

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Malachite with azurite: both malachite and azurite are compounds of copper with oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen. The two differ only in the ratios. By geological standards, this rock formed somewhat quickly. We can tell this because the crystals are numerous and small. Single, large crystals form more slowly. This is why you should make ice cream at low temperatures, because when you freeze it quickly, many tiny crystals form, producing a better texture.

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Pyrite: As you may see, pyrite, or fool’s gold, has a cubic crystalline structure. Pyrite is composed of iron and sulfur.

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Calcite with duftite inclusions: Calcite is known for its optical properties such as birefringence. It was used as a material for gun sights in World War 2. Duftite is a compound of lead, copper, and arsenic. It is the duftite that gives the distinctive green color. I think of this as the kiwi mineral, as it even has the seeds.