Tag Archives: 17 years

Happy 17th Anniversary, Vironevaeh!

Tomorrow is April 15th, 17 years since I did a project about a city named Vironevaeh, chock full of V’s and vowels, because why not? Somehow it never went away, and seventeen years later, it’s hard to imagine life without it. When people ask me what color the sky is in my world, I say purple; it used to be turquoise, but I thought that a white sun was more likely to diffract into the purple frequency range. That’s… usually where those conversations end.

Since the 16th anniversary, I’ve earned my PhD. I’ve started another Vironevaehn history project, and I’ve published my first story set in the Vironevaehn universe. I’ve written drafts for two different novels set in the universe.

But today, I thought I’d post a blast from years farther past. In 8th grade, I wrote my first Vironevaehn book. It was just by hand, and without much planning or forethought, half of it scribbled down during orchestra while my friends patiently ignored my rantings. But I filled a whole notebook with it. 14 years later, that book is one of my most valued possessions. Here I am with it today, and there I was with it 14 years ago, in a Polaroid taken as just another offhand idea.

comparison

 

Create something today, even if it’s silly. The only folly is not trying.

Advertisements

Vironevaeh on Mad Scientist Journal

Check out my story “Carnivorous Fog: Avoidance, Survival, and Eradication Strategies” on Mad Scientist Journal today. Mad Scientist Journal publishes stories in the form of fictitious scientific papers. This paper is set in the same place as my fairy tales, although at a different time. The inspiration for this story came from my Nanowrimo novel; the novel is sort of a wreck, but it gave me several fun ideas.

Most excitingly, this is the first thing I’ve published in the Vironevaehn universe, one that I started nearly 17 years ago. Hopefully it doesn’t take another 17 years for the next publication.

Here’s an accompanying illustration I did after the story. On the left is the “encapsulated” insect, while the free insect is on the right.

SONY DSC