Tag Archives: drawing

Inktober Days 5-11

Happy Inktober!

Here are my drawings for the week. Day 5, chicken, I started on my iPad in AutoDesk Graphic, and finished later in Adobe illustrator. The vector tools in Graphic made importing the started work a lot easier than the Adobe vector tool for iPad. The tools can be a little cumbersome, and don’t feel natively designed for a tablet, but if I want to use work from the iPad later, Graphic is better than its Adobe equivalent. This is mostly because I love Bezier curves. All the other drawings were done in Adobe Sketch.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And for Day 10: flow, I decided to learn one of Adobe’s animation programs, Adobe Animate. I’m still a bit clunky with it, but not bad for a first stab! I made my own Gif!

zoiderg

Advertisements

The Joy of Maps

I love maps. Not the ones that are useful, really. The decorative ones, or the ones that accompany a novel. The useful ones have a sort of dryness to them. I was never a big Tolkien fan, but I liked his maps a lot. Vernor Vinge’s “A Fire Upon the Deep” has a map of the galaxy, and I found that added to my enjoyment. I like historical maps too; you get an insight into past culture that comes much more slowly from print. Old maps sometimes have amazingly different spellings and different borders (Capp Codd instead of Cape Cod, for example, on an old american map). Old city maps reveal the old structures that gave rise to the city of today. A few years ago, the university museum had an exhibition of old maps. A lot of these maps remain available online as well.

In school, I used to dream up exotic places and cultures. I’d sit at my desk and draw up a new world. I’d imagine the cultures of the various regions. How the geography might influence the overall culture. Of course how the various different planets would interact.

In many ways, Vironevaeh, the universe I’ve played in since I was 10, began because of a map. In 5th grade, we were required to invent a city and imagine what kind of climate, government, and culture it might have. Part of the assignment was to build a diorama of the city. I did a poor job on it (long-term projects weren’t a skill of mine at that time), but the seed had been planted. With the map, I had a connection to the place. Over the odd years of middle school I invented an alphabet, a planet, and several dozen playmate planets. Almost 16 years later, long after the death of that diorama, Vironevaeh lives on. The map of Naenaiaeh, below, is about 10 years old. I’ve been slowly making other maps over the years.

(Side note: I’m not sure if anyone checks this blog on its schedule; you may have noticed my schedule was awry last week. I try to post Monday-Wednesday-Friday. I missed a couple of posts last week due to three days of power outage (brr). But I had a lot of time sitting in front of a fire to dream and imagine new ones!)

map naenaiaeh

The sister planet to Vironevaeh. On Naenaiaeh, the people missed earth, and thus re-used the old names from home.

map silveriaeh

Silveriaeh, a planet of almost no water (I did so like the -aeh ending). Dark brown lines indicate fault lines, blue indicate rivers.

map Menekenesthete

Sports Art: Water Polo

This weekend I’m playing a water polo tournament. When I’m not playing, I like to do a little polo-themed art. I love day-dreaming about playing, and sketching the lines of motion put me right in the water too. When I’m not playing, I also love to photograph the games. In the split seconds, you see parts of the game that disappear at full speed. Plus, there is not a great deal of water polo art, besides that destined for t-shirts. Maybe I can share some of the beauty I see in the game.

Mucha-inspired water polo art

polo-mucha

An in-progress work, with the source photo:Scan-linesSC4A9993

 

Maori-warrior interpretation of water polo:

littepic4

 

The backhand shot in water polo, taken from the offensive center position. The offensive center treads 2m in front of the goal, facing away from the goal, with a defender behind.

cutout

Scan 1

Drawing Books: Andrew Loomis

I always find a good drawing book to be very motivating. When I draw, I do best when I have a good visual aid, especially when posing people. Alas, I have no models living in my attic to call upon for posing when the need arises. So a good book of poses is the best substitute I have.

Andrew Loomis was as illustrator in the middle part of the 20th century. He wrote several drawing instruction books as well. These books were very well-regarded and popular, but they went many years without being reprinted. Old copies of the books would sell for over $100 on eBay.

Happily, his books started being reprinted a couple of years ago. They are lovely hard-cover reproductions, available for about $25 each on Amazon.com. I believe four have been released:

  • Figure Drawing for All It’s Worth– A book about drawing the figure. I’ve found in the past many figure books are more men than women (which I always thought was strange). If anything, this book has more female figures, but men are covered as well, as well as various proportions, and the proportions of children.
  • Drawing the Head and Hands– About drawing the head and hands. As you’d expect, this covers the head and hands from all kinds of angles, for different ages and backgrounds.
  • Successful Drawing– I don’t have this one. I find its title vague. I like to imagine I can already draw. But if anyone has read it, I’d be curious to hear.
  • Creative Illustration– I just got this one, but I haven’t had a chance to go through it in much detail. This is the one I’ve been anticipating most, based upon the title. I have observed many heads and hands and figures, but illustration is a way of interpreting the scene to make it more engaging.